What Doll Photography Technique Questions Do You Have?

Supergirl in Doll Duels - Terri Gold

 

Photography Techniques

Terri Gold has a blog post requesting the kinds of questions you might have about Doll Photography techniques.This is right where our own thoughts are headed because it always seemed that discussing and sharing techniques is something that could draw the International Tonner Doll collecting community together. These are the questions she poses:

-What areas of your doll photography would you like to improve?
-What aspects of your camera don’t you understand?
-What are your biggest challenges with doll photography?
-Do any of your photographic results displease you?
-Do you have questions about doll photography?

Terri told us that she is planning a series of articles for FDQ Magazine on doll photography and this is part of her research, so enter your thoughts in the comments section on her blog post or you can add them in comments here too. One reason why this topic is of such interest to us is that part of why we created Tonner Doll Duels is that we hoped that as more and more photography was submitted – and by now we have over 2,100 photos – and the favorites rise to the top, people will be inspired by what they see and start thinking, start getting ideas on what makes a great photograph. And while some of the popular Doll Duels photos are of amazing repaints (or even photoshop-aided creations) what is at core of it all is discovering within yourself how to express what you find most beautiful about the doll or figure you love. Hopefully it should be the beginning of creativity. What is pretty wonderful is that Terri just happens to have the number 1 doll photo on the Leaderboard of Doll Duels at the time of this writing: a Supergirl she calls her favorite Tonner.

If you would like to write a guest blog post for us sharing what you’ve learned about photography we would really love it. Dos and don’ts, techniques you’ve discovered or invented, thoughts about light quality, anything you think others would benefit to hear we’ll welcome your submission. Just email us at tonnersocialmedia@gmail.com

 

 

About Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu

Director of Social Media for the Tonner Doll Company, Inc. You can find me on Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/108802069053908824216 or on Twitter as @mediasres

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Written by Kevin von Duuglas-Ittu. Posted in Doll Photography

Published on March 24, 2012 with 3 Comments

3 Comments

There are currently 3 Comments on What Doll Photography Technique Questions Do You Have?. Perhaps you would like to add one of your own?

  1. I am a self-admitted novice at doll photography in particular (and eBay product photography in general). I know enough to use a neutral background (usually a white sheet draped over a 2ft.x3ft. piece of foam core board and a card table, those 2 items pushed up against the kitchen door or a wall), to have plenty of light coming from various directions (including natural light when available), and to use a tripod (because it holds the camera steadier than I can). I’ve also learned how to use the zoom so the item I’m photographing will fill the image area better, and can crop and color-correct with my image-editing software.
    However, I know that there are lots of details I’m not very good at yet, f.ex.:
    a) How do I get the doll to stand up straight if I don’t have a proper doll stand? Is there something I can improvise for long enough to get the picture taken?, and
    b) What if I have the original packaging and want to include it in the photo? What if the doll is still fastened to the inner packaging? What if the doll is in one of those clear plastic boxes or tubes – can I emphasize the doll’s pristine condition while minimizing reflections from that clear plastic?

  2. I would just have to say use natural lighting whenever possable. Keep the camera flash off if you need indoor light invest in some studio lights. They are not very expensive and well worth the money.

    The second thing is just take the time to set up your shot. Make sure everything in the photo is in the right scale. Take the time to set the doll up. Make sure the clothing is well pressed.Check her or his hair if you miss a hair on a close up face shot you will regret it when it shows up in your photo’s. If I am taking several photo’s I will set it up and take a couple of quick shots with my little digital camera. Just to check to make sure what I see is really what I am getting.

    Happy Photo’s

    • Tess, love your suggestions! And the idea of quick-hitting digital snaps as a kind of preview makes great sense.

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